A Distributor’s Perspective On Building Materials Marketing

Building Brands Ep 26 - Jordan Russin - A Distributor's Perspective On Building Materials Marketing

Jordan Russin, Co-President of Russin, talks about preserving the legacy of a 50+ year old generational family business as he and his brother sought to modernize and reposition their company’s brand for the new age of digital. He touches on creative ways manufacturers are supporting distributors and retailers and how Russin has made sure that they live up to being resourceful experts in the industry.

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Episode Transcript
Tim
Welcome Building Brands listeners. For our 26th episode, I’m joined by Jordan Russin, Co-President at Russin. Russin helps their customers decide on the best when you don’t want to settle for a second best on your next project. Let Russin be your guide, their product experts can help you find the perfect product for your needs. In this episode, Jordan talks about preserving the legacy of a 50 plus year old generational family business as he and his brother sought to modernize and reposition their company’s brand for the new age of digital. He touches on creative ways manufacturers are supporting distributors and retailers and how ricin has made sure they live up to being resourceful experts in the industry. Enjoy the episode.

Tim
If you’re an owner or marketer in the building materials, manufacturing, distribution, or contracting spaces, looking to set up your brand for success now and in the future. This is the podcast for you. on this show, we talk about brand and market strategies used in the real world that grow companies and truly connect with consumer audiences. So sit back listening and let’s get to it. Okay, welcome Jordan ricin to building brands podcast. You are the CO president at ricin, which is a building materials distributor disclaimer, you are also aluminous client. So we’ve worked with you for about a year and a half now. And I know you personally but you have the perfect perspective for this episode. So thanks for coming on.

Jordan
Well, thanks, Tim. Great to be here. Glad to be able to join you.

Tim
So the question I always start with, and we’ll dive right into that is tell us a little bit about you and your professional background, how you got into building materials and what you do at Russin in your leadership role.

Jordan
Sure. So we’re a family company, my grandfather started the business and he’s 95 years old, healthy as a horse probably on a golf course right now, we should all aspire to grow up and be my grandfather one day. But as for me, personally, I was a writer for men’s lifestyle magazine in New York City, enjoying life quite a bit, but wasn’t a long term path for me, you can understand that. And one thing I realized I was fairly good at was talking and that seemed to lend itself to a career in sales. So that was what gave me my entree into rustling lumber. And what I realized, honestly, a little surprisingly, at first was that I really liked it. Once you enjoy what you’re doing, it’s sort of easy to take the next steps.

Tim
Yeah, and you’ve moved from just coming out in a sales role as you entered into the company to kind of working your way up to taking over a leadership role as part of carrying on the family in the leadership roles at the company. How are you working in that role? What are some of the goals that you came into that role with that have affected how you’ve run the company and brought it to where it is today?

Jordan
Sure, well, one of the great things that I think I can credit my dad for was he didn’t just drop me into leadership and say, Hey, you know, you’re awesome, good luck to you, you should be good. I definitely have to work for every position that I earned every promotion that I received. And I can say at this point that I’ve held every single position in the company with the exception of over the road truck driver. So I’ve handled lumber, I’ve worked in our credit department, I’ve managed the reception desk, I’ve worked with our traffic managers, and so when I work with any of our employees on any individual issue, whatever the topic may be, I can confidently say, I’ve been there because I have actually done that job. Awesome. You know, from a leadership standpoint, I mean, really, that, to me is more about helping our employees to do what they’re already great at. It’s not about controlling them and to some company initiative. You know, we’re fortunate that we’ve got great people who are really, really strong at what they do. And if I can just give them the runway to do what they’re great at, we’re gonna be in really good shape.

Tim
Yeah, talk about the history of the company a little bit in a in a way where it doesn’t turn into Lord of the Rings or something like that, because I think it’ll be important to you, you know, the company has been around for a while. And it’s evolved over time through both the industry and technology and, and trends in building and everything going on. So talk a little bit about that, because I think that we’ll end up a bridging us down the road into a little bit of what you’ve done over the last couple of years with the company.

Jordan
Sure. So my grandfather, as I mentioned, founded the company in 1957. After he came back from World War Two, he needed a job and found that job on the forklift at a lumber company over time realized there were some things that he felt he could do better himself. So to make a long story short, here we are. What we started as was really more of a stair building supply house. There’s a profile called 6010 handrail, which is sort of the David gore profile and stair building. My grandfather will claim he invented that profile. I don’t know if I believe him, but he’s 95 so we cut them.

Tim
These are the stories on the golf course they get told

Jordan
Exactly. And we started supplying stair parts to all the small little mom and pop stair shops in and around outer boroughs in New York City, Brooklyn and Queens primarily. My dad joined the company in 72, he was the sixth employee of rustling lumber. And it was really his vision to take the business from being purely a stair building supply business, to more of a wholesale building material supply company. He was the one who first got us into pine boards and western red cedar products and some of the traditional products that became the mainstays of the business for when I joined all those years later.

Tim
So who are you guys primarily working with at the distribution level, I know this, but I’ll let you recap it for the audience. Who are your primary targets that you’re trying to reach out to in your sales process and what we’re doing through marketing activities?

Jordan
Sure. So our customer is the retail Lum lumber dealer, retail siding, house goes, whether two step or one step companies that are supplying contractors, professional contractors and builders, that you ultimately receives our materials that you pays our invoices, that’s our our target customer. But as I say that, that may be our customer. But that’s not always our target market. You know, so one thing that I think we’ve recognized over time, is that while those customers are key to our business model, so is their customer who’s ultimately going to make a decision on what products go on their house. So, you know, the customer who pays our bills, and the person that we’re ultimately marketing too, may not always be that same person.

Tim
Yeah. And that’s where you end up in a little bit of the homeowner space. And the people that are creating demand for the product, they have to go through retail, or sometimes they would go straight through distribution and get put through retail as the delivery source, but they’re driving the demand. And that’s some of the things that you have to get in motion to start gaining interest in products and starting regeneration and all that good stuff.

Jordan
What I was gonna say is, you know, sort of one of my foundational principles for for this business is that the internet has irrevocably changed our businesses, whether or not we and our customers recognize it on a day to day basis.

Tim
Yeah, totally. You know,

Jordan
when I first got started in this business, I’d bring a sample to a lumberyard, place it on the counter and the lumberyard would use that sample to generate sales. I think today that counter that showroom at the lumber dealer, is where people go to confirm what they’ve seen online. But it’s not the start of the procurement process. It’s not the start of the ideation process. When homeowners, when architects and specifiers are starting to think about, Hey, I’m designing a home, I’m building a home, I’m remodeling a home, and I’m thinking about new siding. They do their research online first. And generally they call my customer far more educated than they ever were. Yeah, let’s

Tim
talk about the evolution of the company. And even in terms of what you guys are doing with the materials that you carry, and everything, you recently with the work that you did with us actually modified the name of the company. And that was for a very specific reason to position you slightly differently in the market. Do you want to talk about what motivated that? And then how how that’s being implemented and what that could do for you moving forward?

Jordan
Sure. So you know, realistically, what we’re selling is high end consumer products, many of which happened to be lumber. But despite the role that the lumber industry plays in our overall economy and in the market that we service, and despite the role that it’s always played, I think in today’s world, the word lumber connotes a blue collar image. And that just doesn’t always jive with the experience that specifiers and high end homeowners are looking for when they source the products that we offer. So the name change from rustling lumber to ricin was simply a subtle nod to a recognition of the changes that are going on in our industry at large and how consumers source materials.

Tim
Yeah, lumber does carry a little bit of a connotation of retail level too. And that could be very confusing to you when people are trying to figure out who they should reach out to.

Jordan
Right. And I think it also, you know, everybody in their individual town where they live has the local lumber yard. And somehow there’s that small local connotation to that word. I don’t think it’s honestly fair. But fair enough. It’s in people’s minds. And so I think that name change might, whether through sleight of hand or whatever, enable customers to see us as more of a product expert rather than simply a supply us.

Tim
Yeah, and they will have access to people at the retail level, but they’re going to get a little bit more of an expert driven sales process and customer service process when they’re dealing with the distribution level.

Jordan
Yeah, well, the reality is that our customers are forced in today’s world to be experts in so much stuff need my customer who I’m talking to about decking or citing his last call might have been about Windows doors. Or Basement Systems or whatever. And he’s forced to have all this knowledge that I’m not forced to have, and I couldn’t possibly imagine having. So, you know, we take what we’re good at, which is a relatively small part of the industry try to do that extremely well with a tremendous amount of knowledge and bring that knowledge downstream to the ultimate end user.

Tim
And the other portion of renaming a company comes with a new visual representation. And I know this is a hot button topic for especially legacy built family companies. And you went through that process with us. Do you want to talk a little about Could you talk a little bit about what it was like keeping changing the name and modifying the visual representation and making sure that you didn’t lose part of that history and legacy that you’ve built up brand equity for over the better part of a century?

Jordan
Yeah, I’m glad you asked. Because it’s a really tough balance that you strike, I mean, one is you want to be true to your roots. In my case, I want to be true to my family, and to my grandfather, who founded the company, my father who stewarded wrestling for 45 years, and also Most importantly, to the customers who depended upon us for over half a century. Because of that, we don’t take a name change or a logo change lightly. It’s not the kind of thing that you just say, Yeah, what the hell, you know, so you want to, you want to tread very carefully, and you want to be sure to remain true to the style and the method of going to market that our customers have always experienced. And, you know, I think we were very clear with with luminous when we first started that it was critical for our customers that they are experienced, not change. And that how they recognized ricin as a company didn’t change. But at the same time, we made ourselves more available to new customers who might want to work with us.

Tim
Yeah, and it lends itself a little bit better to your position of being the expert voice and being that customer service, go between to get the right high quality products and all that good stuff.

Jordan
Yeah, and I also think, you know, our business is specialized, there are certain categories within wood and non wood products that were extremely strong in. And I don’t know that Russin Lumber did a great job of explaining that to the market. You know, it didn’t really explain to our customers, how we differentiated what we did, versus a lumber supplier that’s in the commodity space. And so hopefully, our new name plus the brand identity that we put around that helps to clarify in the minds of the marketplace, what it is that we do and why we do it.

Tim
I’m not sure I’ve actually had enough drinks with you to ask this question in person. But there I asked what your father and grandfather think of the new name and logo presentation. My grandfather

Jordan
loves it. I mean, I honestly think at 95, my grandfather loves that his grandchildren are obsessed with the business that he found. And, you know, find as much personal pride and joy in it as he did. For my father, I think it was a bigger left, I think, you know, he had an emotional tie to our original logo. And I think initially, he took one look at our new logo and didn’t get it. But over time, you started to see the impact of the advertising, he started to see the leads that our new presence online has generated. And obviously that that speaks to him the success, you know, rings true. So he says come around.

Tim
Well, that’s a perfect segue. I was going to talk about modernizing the other aspect of your presentation. And that big project was the website, you have a number of brands with an extensive catalog of products within them. And over time, older company, you had multiple instances of web builds online that were connected to the old Russ and lumber website, and that got kind of deconstructed, built back up into the new presentation, but also a new product or organization and adding some more resources on the site. How do you feel that that is setting you up for a different or improved approach to what you’re doing with your sales and marketing activities moving forward?

Jordan
What it really enables us to do is to deliberately target a customer segment who previously we had hoped would just happen upon receiving lumber. We’ve made a deliberate effort to target the target to help our customers customer find our customer. I realized that’s a mouthful, lots

Tim
of levels, man levels.

Jordan
But you know, realistically, when a when a homeowner goes online, and they’re thinking about, hey, this might be the year that I replace my deck, what resources are out there to help them really compare the many different products that are out there on the market and get an honest basis for comparison between high end wood products, entry level composites, the differing levels of wood and non wood that might be out in the marketplace, and really get an unbiased approach as to what might speak individually to them as, as homeowners and consumers.

Tim
And then increasing your visibility through the website to you can be that first touch point that they come across. And then all of a sudden, they’re in your ecosystem where you’re helping them because you have those resources online, and the best examples of the installations of those products. And those comparisons are invaluable to

Jordan
Yeah, and look, quite honestly, when we sit down with one of our dealer customers who, as I mentioned, you know, that’s, that’s, that’s what’s critical to our business, that’s who pays our bills every day. You know, the fact that we are generating leads through our website and bringing customers to them who are excited to purchase our products, means a lot to those customers. We’re not just here to sell our dealers or product, we’re here to bring them a business that can help them sell the products that we’re

Tim
Yeah, the website itself is also a good tool we’ve we’ve used for advanced analytical reporting, as well, there’s a lot of tracking points on that site. So it gives us you know, digital marketing is a moving target. And it’s not always perfect. But if you have the right data and tracking setup, you can make educated decisions to pivot improve, drop something if you just think it’s completely waste of time. And that’s another way where we have more data now to make more valuable decisions, it makes our conversations back and forth a little bit more meaningful.

Jordan
Yeah, I mean, obviously, if you know who your customer is, you know how much time they’re spending on your website. And you know, which pages are attracting attention and which ones aren’t, it helps you to make better decisions as to where you spend your money. And where as a sales team, we put our focus and energy.

Tim
Hmm. So let’s talk about how you’re getting the things to put stuff on the website include these things in your in your sales process, you are essentially, middleman is such a terrible word. You’re a person that’s part of the process for someone to source high end manufactured goods in the building materials market. So you are working with manufacturers and some there’s a lot of hurdles that distributors have to get over to be able to do some of the things that you’re doing with your website and digital campaigns. You know, as a distributor, you’re sort of representing a large breadth of those brands, how do you start to choose which products might be most appropriate to put in front of your audiences and have the marketing efforts put behind? What makes them stand out is like the first candidates, like, let’s get these products out in front of people first?

Jordan
Yeah, I think it’s a great question, because you can have the greatest website in the world. But if your products are exactly identical to everything else that’s out there. How do you differentiate yourself, aside from the fact that your interface might be pretty, so great, you know, really, I view my job more than anything else as product curation, and helping my customers and my customers customers to find brands and products that are truly on trend, truly differentiated, and have product attributes that they’re not going to find from six other flavors of the same ice cream? So you know, that really is the starting point is, is this product highly differentiated? Are there 13 other people producing a facsimile of the same thing? Or do we really have something here that can stand out? When you pick

Tim
and you start to bring those people into your your marketing systems? What are you relying on manufacturers to help you acquire to be able to plug things in what makes your job easier at your level to get your marketing and sales activities in front of your target audiences?

Jordan
Some of the questions that we asked at the very beginning of of a product discussion with a new with a new supplier is a trying to understand do we see the world the same way as far as marketing, to many manufacturers still see the world the way my dad’s building material industry saw the world, which is produce a product, maybe make a piece of literature and then it’s up to the distributor sales team to sell it. And in 2021, I think that’s sort of going the way of the dodo. So, you know, a big part of it, for me is just understanding. Do we think the same? I mean, quite honestly, Tim, I don’t know that Ruslan and luminous would have gotten to where we are today, if I didn’t believe that you and I see the world similar. Sure. Right. You know, I mean, I go back to the classic Simon Sinek line of we’re not looking for people who buy what we sell, we’re looking for people who believe what we believe. And that’s doubly true when you’re looking for vendors to partner with. We’re looking for people who see the world the same way we do and understand that to get your product out into the market. It’s not about selling a dealer. It’s about showing a consumer that your product has relevance hasn’t placed in that market. And if you do that, then the dealer is going to want to purchase that product because they’re going to see

Tim
and that comes with some tangible things that manufacturers could support. make available to distributors to help in that process, too. I know you, obviously we have some campaigns for some of the manufacturers that we work with through the campaigns we’re doing for you, can you just talk about some of the ways that you’re able to that they support your efforts and your marketing to bring in those audiences? Sure.

Jordan
I mean, so the smart vendors out there are using all the technological tools that we have available to us as consumers, and are thinking like consumers when they’re developing their marketing. And that means they’re spending money on video, they’re spending money on graphical elements that will help an installer or a homeowner understand not just what their product is, but what it does and what makes it special. They’re providing, not just a brochure or a piece of literature, but a BIM file, a spec sheet, something an architect can download something that’s going to truly make a specifier. Consumer contractors life easier when they’re working with your product. It’s too easy today to pop on a website, not find what you’re looking for, and disappear to somebody else who’s going to deliver on. So a good responsible manufacturers job is to understand what those deliverables are, and work on those on the front end, so that they’re available. And those questions get answered very easily.

Tim
And this goes back to their approach to how their brand is portrayed in the market as well, they very likely have their own marketing activities going on. So they should also want to have some of these high level installation videos, very useful. vim, and you know, digital build files, and all the things that you would want to throw into a marketing campaign of your own. And, and that’s something where, you know, when, when you’re trying to choose who you want to put money towards, in your marketing efforts, you’re going to go for the easy kills, and like we can duplicate or repurpose and integrate some of the stuff into ricin branded pieces that also gain interest in the product, and do a very good job of creating interest to come through our sales channels and ultimately sell for the manufacturer as well. So everyone wins.

Jordan
Yeah, exactly. But it’s it’s really all about that core integral understanding of who is your ultimate customer, and how do they want to buy. And if we start by thinking that way, and then working our sales and marketing strategy backwards from that we’re going to be in a good place. If we start thinking about what is the manufacturer, or do I want to give to the market? And what’s my budget to give that? Well, chances are, we’re going to miss the target.

Tim
Well, let’s talk about budgets in a very high level, because we don’t need to go into detail on this. There are actual ways where manufacturers could literally support distributors and dealers in trying to gain interest in their products to and that could be a variety of different programs. If you come across any of that you’ve worked with some manufacturers on that you’ve seen benefits from

Jordan
well, different manufacturers view that differently. And, you know, I think the old school way of doing it is, you know, give you a 1% Co Op fund. And if you buy a million dollars worth of sales, we’re going to give you a 10 grand, you know, go go build your website, Jordan have a good. You know, I think that the smart manufacturers today recognize which of their partners understand how to bring products to market, and that the way of bringing those products to market has changed irrevocably from what might have been a decade ago. And so that may not be as simple as all of our customers get a 1% Co Op fund. But it may mean thinking a little bit differently about, you know, going back to what I said previously, understanding how consumers source products, and working with the people who can deliver on that consumer experience.

Tim
And your new approach to how you’re presenting resin in the market aligns with the manufacturers that have started doing that as well. And that’s what you’re talking about by having that connection and the same approach to how consumers like to be engaged with nowadays.

Jordan
Right? And you know, and honestly, it means in our case, as well putting our money where our mouth is, and yeah, it’s not just as simple as, hey, the manufacturer gave us x. So we put x towards Google or Facebook, it’s, you know, Russell needs to take those first steps down that yellow brick road and show the manufacturer or a lot of times the result of those efforts so that they’re willing to dive all in as well.

Tim
And you better have advanced systems in place to be able to track and report on those things.

Jordan
Well, that’s right. I mean, we’ve all made the mistake. And certainly I’m guilty of it, of thinking that you’re going to go on Facebook all on your own spend $500 on an ad campaign and you own the world.

Tim
I love Yes, everyone. Everyone has thought that at some point.

Jordan
And I’ve got the receipts to prove that that is

Tim
so let’s talk about The industry just even a little bit more general, right? So building materials industry, you have seen from your level, even with your own company, how you’ve started to evolve with it. Over the past 10 years, you’ve mentioned how over the past 10 years, hell even over the last 12 months, it’s been lightning fast adaptation by companies that have kind of falling behind on their modernization and approach to the market. How do you see that continuing over the next decade in building materials, building products, whichever angle you want to take, where do you see the industry shifting to in the future?

Jordan
Well, I think one obvious change that we’re going to continue to see is just additional consolidation in the marketplace. I mean, some of the big players seem to get bigger by the hour. And that’s going to mean, more segmentation. And honestly, it’s also going to mean, unfortunately, less frontline experience. And that you can’t necessarily count on that first guy who answers the phone at the retail counter to be an expert in our products, especially as I said earlier, when he’s got to be an expert, and Windows and gutters and a whole bunch of other categories that I know nothing about. You know, I think that driving value is an overused buzzword that sort of become meaningless, sir, you know, but in my mind, what it really means is helping our customers to have expertise when they need and, you know, not filling their heads with a whole bunch of product mumbo jumbo that’s going to be in one ear and out the other. But in that moment, when we deliver that customer who’s shown interest in one of our products, and is engaged with us online, that education is there so that that customer can seem like an expert when he reaches out. And that to me drives real value, and helps the customers who ultimately are going to deliver the products and make the sale see not just like suppliers, but like experts that to work. That’s that’s what we want our customers to be.

Tim
It’s a little bit of the Icarus touching the son of it becoming to DIY and to consolidated that it becomes just a mass product market or Alright, everyone go find your own things. And then eventually you might find someone to talk to that can help you figure out which one’s Right.

Jordan
Right, exactly. And you know, the reality is when ultimately, when the ultimate consumer, that end user, that homeowner is thinking about their project, they’re going to be investing, probably one of the most significant spends over their lifetime. In that project. We want to treat them as such, we want to give them that time and that expertise and make sure that all of their questions are answered, so that they can buy that deck, do that siding project, redo their trim on their house, confidently knowing that they’ve explored all the choices that are out there, and that all their questions truly have been answered. And I think too often, this industry has treated them like lumber buyers. And we’re not just selling sticks and cheats anymore.

Tim
One other thing that you mentioned in that that’s important is people do like to approach this buying process differently. Even on your site, we have various ways that people can convert and enter your sales cycle, it could be as simple as the old school way of clicking on a phone number we have tracking for that it could be through a guided forums, you get in the right person’s inbox on the rest of the side, or it could be as simple as a DIY sample request form are like, Hey, I kind of know what I want, your website was super valuable and informative. I’m going to pop these things into a sample request cart, and you can just send that to me and I’m going to be good to go. So there’s like a huge spectrum of how people like to enter that that sales process. And of course, in building materials, you can see a sales process and the sales cycle that’s, you know, a couple of weeks to a couple or month or a year and a half, depending on the size of the project and who’s specking it.

Jordan
And you’re right, and it’s one of the interesting things that I’ve learned since we started this journey, is there are plenty of customers who absolutely don’t want to talk to you until they’re on the one yard line. And they’re about to make their decision. And they prepare to do all their research themselves. there are just as many customers who are going to see your product in an ad or on your website, pick up the phone immediately and call you. And they’re purely in the ideation phase, and it may be 18 months before they’re actually getting ready to do that project. So that’s where it takes not just strong marketing and advertising, but also strong reporting, good CRM and good follow up to understand where that client is in the sales funnel, and patiently be there for them as they take the steps through.

Tim
Yeah, and operationally, you’re doing your work on your side to make sure that you’re set up for that success. And that’s something that you know, marketing can drive as much as it wants to accompany but you also have to be prepared to accept improved growth.

Jordan
Yeah, and you also have to recognize that it’s not selling the way I was taught selling, or the way I think we thought of it in this industry 20 years ago, which is, you know, hey, you quoted that customer on pine, pick up the phone, call them get that product in the door, get him to give you that po. We need to recognize that that homeowner is not going to pull the trigger on that siding project until they’re good and ready and be paid. Until that happens, what cast a wide enough net so that we’re constantly bringing our dealers projects that they can close?

Tim
Yeah. One really good summary question I like to ask and after your experiences over the last few years, you might have a really good take on this. Now, what is one critical thing that you think every manufacturing company or even distribution company, at your level, perhaps even dealer, just in the industry? What should everyone be doing for their brand right now to make them more successful moving forward? Because you have to start at some time? What’s your advice?

Jordan
So I think the first thing is you want to look at is your marketing is your own website? Is your literature a true representation of your company? And how does it explain what your own unique selling proposition is? You know, a website that talks about your tradition of quality of service just isn’t going to cut it in 2021? What are you showing to the world that separates you from everybody else? who’s out there? And is that is that face that you’re putting out there truly who you are. So I think if you start with that, and then start aligning your marketing to what you truly do best, you’re going to be in a great place.

Tim
Yeah, you have to be able to back it up. Consumers are too smart. Now they can sniff that stuff out in a heartbeat. And, and, and then of course, if it’s not a compelling argument, it’s twice as bad. Yeah. Yeah. Is there anything else that you think we haven’t touched on that you think would be a valuable addition, based on your perspective, from the distribution level that you could add in?

Jordan
You know, I think it’s important when you think about your marketing presence, and how you want to present yourself to the market, not just thinking about who your customer base is today. But also thinking about who their customer basis? And ultimately, where do the products you’re supplying go? And who ultimately makes the decision? Who writes the check to put those products on their building? And you know, whether you’re talking to those folks today, or you’re depending on your customer base to talk to those folks? How ultimately, are you going to drive specifications and have your product stand above the crowd? And yeah, once those products do, how do you ensure that those leads make their way back to your company? Cool.

Tim
Before we wrap up, why don’t you tell people a little bit more about where they can find you if they want to connect and where they can look up for us and and learn more about resin?

Jordan
Sure. So www.russin.com is our website, that’s a great resource. We’ve tried to build it to be as responsive to various customer needs as possible. And to mention, there are several ways you can contact us through russell.com. I’m certainly on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, any other social media you can possibly find as our older members of our sales team. So we try to make ourselves easy to contact.

Tim
Awesome. Well, thanks. For the time, this was a really good conversation. I’m very happy that I finally got a distributor angle on the show. So thanks for having your input and sharing all those stories.

Jordan
No, it’s really a pleasure to thanks for this.

Tim
If you’re interested in hearing more stories and strategic insights from industry experts, please subscribe to the Building Brands podcast on Apple, Spotify, or Google. If you’ve enjoyed this episode, please post a review and share with others who may be interested as well. Thanks for listening.